Annuals

Ipomea

Ipomea Image

Common Name: sweet potato vine

Type: Herbaceous perennial

Family: Convolvulaceae

Native Range: Indonesia

Zone: 9 to 11

Height: 0.50 to 1.00 feet

Spread: 8.00 to 10.00 feet

Sun: Full sun

Water: Medium

Maintenance: Low

Suggested Use: Annual, Ground Cover

Flower: Showy

Leaf: Colorful

Tolerate: Deer, Drought, Dry Soil

Grower Information: Tender perennial that is winter hardy to USDA Zones 9-11. Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soils in full sun. Best leaf color usually occurs in full sun. Consistently moist soils are best. This is a tuberous plant that is not grown from seed. Purchase plants in spring and set out after last frost date. In fall before first frost, dig, dry and store tubers in a dry medium (vermiculite or peat) in a cool dry corner of the basement. When tubers sprout in spring, cut them into sections (at least one eye per section) and plant the sections outdoors after last frost date. Tubers can also be sunk ½ way into a large-mouthed glass jar of water in early spring to generate sprouts that can be removed and planted. Container plants and or rooted cuttings taken in late summer may be overwintered indoors in bright sunny locations. Best to rotate plantings to different locations of the garden from year to year to minimize possible fungal disease problems.

 

Category:
Annuals
Sub-Category:

Ipomea

Ipomea Image

Common Name: sweet potato vine

Type: Herbaceous perennial

Family: Convolvulaceae

Native Range: Indonesia

Zone: 9 to 11

Height: 0.50 to 1.00 feet

Spread: 8.00 to 10.00 feet

Sun: Full sun

Water: Medium

Maintenance: Low

Suggested Use: Annual, Ground Cover

Flower: Showy

Leaf: Colorful

Tolerate: Deer, Drought, Dry Soil

Grower Information: Tender perennial that is winter hardy to USDA Zones 9-11. Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soils in full sun. Best leaf color usually occurs in full sun. Consistently moist soils are best. This is a tuberous plant that is not grown from seed. Purchase plants in spring and set out after last frost date. In fall before first frost, dig, dry and store tubers in a dry medium (vermiculite or peat) in a cool dry corner of the basement. When tubers sprout in spring, cut them into sections (at least one eye per section) and plant the sections outdoors after last frost date. Tubers can also be sunk ½ way into a large-mouthed glass jar of water in early spring to generate sprouts that can be removed and planted. Container plants and or rooted cuttings taken in late summer may be overwintered indoors in bright sunny locations. Best to rotate plantings to different locations of the garden from year to year to minimize possible fungal disease problems.